Cardiff Central Station

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Cardiff Central railway station (Welsh: Caerdydd Canolog) is a major railway station in Cardiff and the largest in Wales. It
is an interchange station for local services, the South Wales Main Line, cross-country express trains, and Valley Lines services. The station is operated by Arriva Trains Wales and was known as Cardiff General until 1973. It is located near the Millennium Stadium in Central Square.

The railway station forecourt — in the practical manner common in continental Europe but relatively rare in Great Britain — accommodates Cardiff Central Bus Station.

Platform Usage
Platform 1 is the usual stopping place for the First Great Western High Speed service to London Paddington station and for Arriva Trains Wales services to Gloucester. Platform 2 is the usual stopping place for Arriva Trains Wales services to Manchester and Holyhead and also First Great Western services to Portsmouth Harbour via Southampton.

Platform 3a and 3b are the usual stopping places for the First Great Western high speed service to Swansea and Carmarthen (one or two services are extended to Pembroke Dock on Summer Saturdays). However if Platform 3a or 3b is in use then these services use Platform 4a or 4b.

Arriva Trains Wales services to Carmarthen and Milford Haven mainly use Platform 3a/4a. Terminating services tend to use these two platforms also. Platform 4a is also the stopping point of the Maesteg services.

Platform 6 is the stopping point for all Valley Lines Intra-Cardiff and Valleys services heading via Cardiff Queen Street towards Pontypridd, Rhymney, Merthyr, Aberdare, Coryton and Treherbert. Platform 7 is for services via the Vale of Glamorgan Line to Bridgend; also services to Barry calling at Cardiff Airport Station, and to Penarth. Services to Radyr via the City Line also use this platform.


[edit] Railway Station History
The station was opened by the South Wales Railway in 1850. Its successor company, the Great Western Railway, rebuilt it in 1932 as is marked by the name carved onto the façade (larger than the name of the station). A formerly separate "Riverside" suburban station of 1893 was integrated into the main station in 1940 but its platforms ceased to be used for passenger traffic in the 1960s[1].